Goldsmith Deconstructed

Jerry Goldsmith and the Music of STAR TREK V: THE FINAL FRONTIER

This post continues my look at the music of the Star Trek film franchise. For previous posts: STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE | STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN |
STAR TREK III: THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK | STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME

Because STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME was such a spectacular success, attention quickly turned to another sequel. Due to contractual obligations, the job of directing STAR TREK V was handed over to William Shatner, who also wrote the initial concept for the film. Drawing inspiration from the televangelist phenomenon, Shatners initial outline, subtitled “An Act of Love,” dealt with a holy man on a quest to find God.

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Trek Charts a New Path Home

Leonard Rosenman and the music of STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME

This post continues my look at the music of the Star Trek film franchise. For previous posts:

STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE | STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN
STAR TREK III: THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK

STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME completes a trilogy of films that began with STAR TREK II. Yet in many ways, it also feels completely different from the first two parts in that trilogy and perhaps in the Star Trek franchise as a whole. The tone is noticeably and purposefully lighter, and the extensive location shooting makes the entire film feel much more airy and wide open than the others, which were almost exclusively confined to soundstages.

STAR TREK IV also brought with it a change of composer. James Horner, who had scored the previous two films, departed in favor of Leonard Rosenman, who was a personal friend of director and star Leonard Nimoy. Reportedly, Nimoy had wanted Rosenman to score STAR TREK III, but didn’t have the clout at the time to make it happen. While I would have a hard time imagining anyone other than Horner score SEARCH FOR SPOCK, I don’t think I can hear Horner’s themes working well in STAR TREK IV either.
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The Underappreciated

The Music of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock

This post is written for the Second Annual Remembering James Horner Blogathon hosted by Becky at Film Music Central. It also continues my look back at the music of the Star Trek films in general.

STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE | STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN

The success of STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN virtually guaranteed that there would be a third Star Trek film. Nicholas Meyer, who had so skillfully written and directed the second film, refused to do the third based on his displeasure with the idea of bringing back Spock. Ironically, this would wind up putting Spock himself, Leonard Nimoy, in the director’s chair for the second Star Trek sequel, which was written and produced by Harve Bennett.

IMG_0051One area of continuity between this and the previous film was the retention of James Horner as the composer. In this second film, he would be given the chance to add new themes, primarily for the Klingons and the Genesis Planet, and also further develop multiple themes from the previous film.

In looking back at the scores of the various Star Trek films, STAR TREK III: THE SEARCH FOR SPOCK seems to have fallen in the proverbial crack between the excellent STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN and the immensely entertaining STAR TREK IV: THE VOYAGE HOME (although the score to the latter film is certainly polarizing). On a more personal level, this particular soundtrack holds a special place for me:

STAR TREK III introduced me to the world of film music.

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“Nautical But Nice”

James Horner and the Music for The Wrath of Khan

This post is written as a part of the Second Annual Remembering James Horner Blogathon hosted by Becky at Film Music Central. It also continues my look at the music of the Star Trek film series. For previous reviews: 

STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE 

Despite the financial success of STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE (1979), the film was considered by Paramount Pictures to be a disappointment, owing to spiraling production costs and a script that came together literally at the last minute and that led to a story that left many Trek fans cold.

The end result was that Paramount Pictures decided, if there was to be a second Star Trek film, the budget would have to be considerably smaller. Series creator Gene Roddenberry, who was largely blamed for the cost overruns from the first film, was reduced to an “Executive Consultant” role, while well-regarded TV producer Harve Bennett was put in charge of the franchise.

As he was developing the script with writer Jack B. Sowards, Bennett turned to novelist-turned-director Nicholas Meyer to helm the film. Meyer had recently directed TIME AFTER TIME (1979), but he had almost no familiarity with Star Trek. This actually turned out to be a good thing, since he was able to focus on making the best film possible without staying overly (excessively) reverential to the material.

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The Gold(smith) Standard

The Music of STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE

In the coming weeks, I will be taking a look at each of the scores to the films in the Star Trek franchise. Here, I will talk a bit about the first film, which really set the template for what Trek film music would sound like for more than 35 years.

In 1979, Star Trek, a TV show that had been on the air only for three short seasons yet drew a fan base unequaled for its time through syndication, was reborn as a feature film. While the music written for the series by Alexander Courage, Gerald Fried, Fred Steiner, and others had often been memorable but not what I would call “cinematic.” To bring Trek to the big screen would require the skills of one of the biggest names in film music: Jerry Goldsmith.

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